Posts Tagged :

speech

Autism Q&A

A Defiant Attitude or Autism?

560 315 Paul Louden

Welcome to the Louden on Autism Q & A. This week, I’m back to answer a question submitted by a website visitors to shed light on some of the most important questions about autism. I receive questions every day, and I want to make sure that the answers to these important questions are being shared with all of you.

 

Please know that these are my opinions and my answers come from my research and my own personal experiences. Of course, each situation is different. All of us as people are different. And no two people with or without autism should be treated the same exact way.

 

This week, I received a a question about a defiant attitude form a person with Autism. Here’s the question and answer:

 

QUESTION

 

How do you know when certain behavior is the autism or just being defiant? My 14 year old becomes aggressive and loses temper easily when things don’t go his way especially with his much younger siblings.

 

ANSWER

 

There’s no real “tell” that I’m aware of, unfortunately. We’re people, so asking that can be like looking at a purple wall and asking “how do I know which parts are red and which parts are blue?” For example, it’s possible that he becomes frustrated with the situation because of the autism, but the actions he chooses to demonstrate it are a result of personality that needs guidance.

 

Aggressiveness isn’t typically a core aspect of autism. On the other hand, the situation itself could be a clash of personalities, while the aggressive response is because autism has so far deprived him of life experiences and skills that help him resolve it in other ways. While aggressiveness is less likely in autism, it’s not impossible, especially if it’s developed over time in response to the world around him.

 

The best starting point is just to see if you can get him to open up about it. Try to make sure he doesn’t feel “interrogated” or necessarily “in the wrong.” Just that you’re interested in why he did what he did. See if he can, probably slowly and across multiple incidents, be coaxed into opening up about what leads to these situations.

 

Whether it’s autism or personality, you still want to understand the behavior and you want to change it. The major difference is really in how you go about trying for change, and that can only come from a deeper understanding of what’s actually happening inside his mind when things go wrong.

 

Thanks for reading. Check back soon for another Q&A.

Autism Q&A

Louden on Autism Q & A: Speech Therapy?

560 315 Paul Louden

Welcome to the Louden on Autism Q & A. This week, I’m back to answer a question submitted by a website visitors to shed light on some of the most important questions about autism. I receive questions every day, and I want to make sure that the answers to these important questions are being shared with all of you.

 

Please know that these are my opinions and my answers come from my research and my own personal experiences. Of course, each situation is different. All of us as people are different. And no two people with or without autism should be treated the same exact way.

 

This week, I received a question about autism and speech therapy. Here it is…

 

QUESTION

 

I have two sons, ages 11 and 9, who have autism. We are doing ABA and speech therapy. How did you come out of it? Any recommendations going forward?

 

ANSWER

 

I haven’t done ABA therapy. I’ve worked with someone who was a BCBA but when we worked together she was practicing a different therapy.

 

As always there are many approaches to autism, and each one tackles different aspects of it. ABA can be good for developing specific behaviors, but make sure you’re working with someone who recognizes that autism isn’t just behaviors and that sometimes behavioral change can lead to more stress, anxiety, and potential depression.

 

A good practitioner will keep you in the loop, and adjust things based on the current state of wellbeing of your children. Beyond that, remember to give them lots of opportunities to be themselves. Intense therapies can often wear away at your ability to feel confident in your own decision making, as many of your decision-making tools have now come from “outside” and replaced the ones you’d come up with yourself.

 

So, giving them chances to take the lead, and live life their way can help them maintain the confidence necessary to take skills and make them their own, rather than just repeating someone else’s teachings.

 

Thanks for reading. Check back soon for another Q&A.